Practitioner FAQ

As of June 10, 2022, the compact has been passed in 21 states (Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming), and the legislation is pending in 4 others (Delaware, Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania). Additionally, the legislation was introduced in Texas but did not pass this session. If your state is not listed, the legislation has not been introduced there.

 

For more details and the most up-to-date information, see the map here: https://otcompact.org/compact-map/. If your state has not yet introduced the compact, introducing it is the first step. See below for how to help with this process.

No. Although your state passing the Compact is an important step, it does not automatically approve your license for use in other states. Counselors must apply for the privilege to practice in each state through the Compact. We expect applications for Compact privileges to open in late 2023 or early 2024.

You can find a status update on Compact privilege availability here.

Because the legislative process is unpredictable, it is impossible to guarantee a Compact bill will be introduced or enacted in a particular state. When bills are introduced or enacted, the website map is updated promptly, so you may refer to that page for up-to-date information.

AOTA is working in collaboration with state occupational therapy associations to advocate for the OT compact in each state. If you would like to advocate for the Compact in your state, please contact your state occupational therapy association to get involved in the state association’s advocacy efforts, or email AOTA State Affairs at stpd@aota.org.

In August, all the current Compact member states will convene to establish the governing structure to oversee implementation. After this process is completed, which may take 12-18 months, states will be able to issue Compact privileges.

The Compact is in effect only in states that have enacted the Compact.

For you to practice in other states through the Compact, your home state and the state(s) in which you wish to practice must be Compact members. If this is not the case, the best way for you to practice in a state is through approval via the individual state’s regular licensing process.

You are able to participate in the Compact if you received a license under previous licensing requirements. The licensing requirements in the Compact ensure all member states have the same requirements for individuals entering the profession.

Click here for a status update on the Compact. Privileges are expected to open for application in 2023.

For you to practice in other states through the Compact, your home state and the state(s) in which you wish to practice must be Compact members. If this is not the case, the best way for you to practice in other states is through approval via the individual state’s regular licensing process.

Now that 10 states have enacted Compact legislation, member states will establish the governing structure to oversee implementation. After this process is completed, which may take 12-18 months, states will be able to issue Compact privileges. We hope privileges will be available early in 2023.

At that point, licensed professionals will be able to apply for the privilege to practice in other states.

The cost of a Compact privilege is set by each state. Once states are ready to issue privileges, more information on the exact cost of a privilege for that state will be available.

A license refers to the standard license granted by your home state. A privilege to practice is granted by other Compact member states after your home state license has been approved.

Practitioners only need to complete CEUs for their home state. Practitioners do need to complete jurisprudence examinations in each state where they want to apply for a privilege to practice.

Join our mailing list for quarterly updates on the compact’s progress.